Why are there so few right wing comedians?

theclaud

Senior Member
I do not even know if this is true

The honesty is refreshing.
 

AuroraSaab

Well-Known Member
I would imagine the demographic for watching live comedy is mostly younger people who are probably more receptive to political comedy. They tend to be more left of centre than older folk. There probably are comedians with more conservative views but they don't make politics part of their routines because it wouldn't be popular with live audiences, which is usually the springboard to tv work.

Also the Tories have been in power a while and it's always the incumbent party who get the most attention.

I don't watch live comedy much these days but my impression is that most stand ups do personal, observational stuff, not overtly political stuff, whether it's left or right wing, so perhaps there is a limited audience for political material. Plus we are in an era where people are vilified for their views so you can understand all artists choosing to be more apolitical.
 

Fab Foodie

Veteran
I do not even know if this is true but there is certain anger about most comedians.

Any answers?

IIRC, there was a time when most comedy and Comedians were pretty offensive to many in society, picking on Women, blacks, gays, irish etc. etc. All fair game at the time. Whether this was considered 'Right Wing' comedy I don't know. Then IIRC, the 'alternative comedy' scene challenged the status-quo being liberal and left-leaning in terms of politics. As the outsiders to the norm am glad the AC crowd seems to have won the day - in the UK at least.
That's not to say that there aren't RW comedians out there in the UK today, but they're less likely to get mainstream media exposure.
As for other parts of the world like Leftpondia - I can't be sure, but my inkling is that Right Wing Comedy is alive and kicking in Hicksville....
 
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icowden

Senior Member
I do not even know if this is true but there is certain anger about most comedians.
The usual argument is that comedy usually punches up rather than down. So comedians tend to make fun of those in power, the wealthy etc rather than mocking the poor and disabled. Equally people who are well off don't tend to go into comedy - it tends to be people who haven't been able to find an outlet or a career. There are exceptions of course - John Bishop was a successful ad man.

Geoff Norcott styles himself as a right wing comedian but arguably is pretty liberal rather than right wing. Jim Davidson is probably the most famous right wing comedian but is much derided as he tends to stray into the racist, sexist territory.

There are of course comedians who don't get involved in satire or politics. I don't think you could say that Milton Jones is right or left wing for example.

Equally, the people that say there is a problem with lefty comedians tend to be those in power who don't like being mocked and have no sense of humour (Nadine Dorries for example).
 

winjim

This snowflake's an avalanche
What do we mean by right wing? Tax avoidance? Offensive material? Is Jimmy Carr right wing?

I feel that right and left wing have kind of lost their meanings at the moment. If somebody could define what they mean to the agreement of us all then that would be a start. For me it's an economic distinction, higher vs lower taxes, public vs private ownership, state support vs corporate philanthropy, that sort of thing. But it doesn't seem that many people agree with that and want to roll all sorts of other baggage in with it. I'm a bit lost in it all TBH.
 

stowie

Regular
Geoff Norcott styles himself as a right wing comedian but arguably is pretty liberal rather than right wing. Jim Davidson is probably the most famous right wing comedian but is much derided as he tends to stray into the racist, sexist territory.

Equally, the people that say there is a problem with lefty comedians tend to be those in power who don't like being mocked and have no sense of humour (Nadine Dorries for example).


I think therein lies one of the reasons that a lot of comedians at least appear to be on the "left" of politics. We have had Conservative government for the majority of our lifetimes - younger comedians may have had no experience of Labour government in their adult life at this point. Much comedy will be about punching up at authority and power - after all punching down usually isn't that funny and often crosses the line into meanness and bullying. If you are going to be punching up and joking about authority that is almost certainly going to be aimed at the Tories since they are the establishment and the powerful.
 

AndyRM

Senior Member
They aren't particularly entertaining. It's perfectly possible to make controversial jokes. But going politicising them? Not necessary.
 
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