These Covid Polices Are Going Well .....

Mugshot

Active Member
He'll be some kind of office bod no doubt.

Which one do you reckon? Craig or icowden, or both?
 

icowden

Well-Known Member
Just humour me, highlight the bit where I said Drs and nurses aren't health workers please? Was it this bit?
Apologies - I misread that bit. So I think we are agreed as to what health and social care workers are. It's very confusing when you take this sort of tack:

It isn't point scoring. Your pithy little summary says 'healthcare workers', which quietly insinuates 'nurses', I just wondered if you knew which healthcare workers are having the free tests withdrawn? Of course, if it easier, just say 'I haven't got a clue, but it sounds worse if I write that'

Which suggests that you think healthcare workers *doesn't* include Nurses. I don't understand why you would say this knowing that helthcare workers includes Nurses.

You also went on to say that:
Just to be clear, HCW does not just include doctors, nurses, therapists etc, you have fallen in to mjr's insinuation that patient facing staff are having their tests removed.
Actually all of those people you have helpfully listed will still be able to access LFD's (that is the proper name for LFTs to you) and will be able to test just as is now.
The 'healthcare workers' who are having the tests removed could be anyone else, like a person who works in stores and never goes near a patient, or someone who works in education of nurses/drs in Universities and so never goes near a patient, or the IT teams who may not even be based on site etc. A headline of 'NHS IT guy who works 11 miles from hospital and never sees a patient has free testing removed' is not quite so impactful is it?
which we have already agreed is nonsense because the NHS IT guy isn't patient facing and therefore isn't having regular asymptomatic testing.

This is reinforced by the article:

UKHSA is now proposing to health ministers that it suspend regular asymptomatic testing in hospitals and care homes from May to save money before a potential winter spike in cases. Sources in the organisation said funding for asymptomatic testing in high risk settings is only enough to cover six months in a year,
So they aren't suspending testing in the IT block and management centre, they are recommending suspending it in hospitals and care homes. You refute this by providing a link to guidance which was written 2 weeks before the UKHSA announcement.

As yet, no hospitals or care homes will have decided whether they will comply with the guidance and the Government guidance has not been updated because the Health Minister has not yet decided whether to follow the guidance from the UKHSA. If they do, then Trusts will either have to find the money to continue from elsewhere, or not continue.

I'm therefore struggling to understand why you sneer at the article in the Guardian. It seems pretty factual to me.

Oh and it is LFDs that are being discussed as accuracy seems all important to you , not LFT (or even LTF, whatever the hell that actually is).
Yep, that was a typo, which I couldn't correct when I spotted it as the edit button had gone. I think LTF is a protein but I could be wrong.
 
Last edited:

winjim

Well-Known Member
It isn't point scoring.

Actually all of those people you have helpfully listed will still be able to access LFD's (that is the proper name for LFTs to you) and will be able to test just as is now.
Oh and it is LFDs that are being discussed as accuracy seems all important to you , not LFT (or even LTF, whatever the hell that actually is).
Point scoring nonsense and incorrect in any case.
 

winjim

Well-Known Member
Which bit was wrong?

Your protestations about point scoring for starters. And your point about LFTs not being called LFTs is pedantic, pernickerty, point scoring nonsense. It's absolutely fine to call them LFTs. We call them LFTs at work, our trust calls them LFTs in the testing guidance, they are LFTs.

Bear in mind that I work in a discipline which uses the abbreviation LFT for a different panel of tests _all the time_ and we still manage to work out which we mean from the context.
 

Craig the cyclist

Active Member
Your protestations about point scoring for starters. And your point about LFTs not being called LFTs is pedantic, pernickerty, point scoring nonsense. It's absolutely fine to call them LFTs. We call them LFTs at work, our trust calls them LFTs in the testing guidance, they are LFTs.

Bear in mind that I work in a discipline which uses the abbreviation LFT for a different panel of tests _all the time_ and weI am struggling to see which bit was actually wrong?
I am struggling to see which bit was wrong then? The fact that they are widely known as LFTs is true, but they are properly called LFDs are they not?
 

winjim

Well-Known Member
I am struggling to see which bit was wrong then? The fact that they are widely known as LFTs is true, but they are properly called LFDs are they not?

I think it's more like a SARS-CoV-2 antigen rapid lateral flow immunochemical assay.


What they are 'properly' called is not the point and you know it.
 

Craig the cyclist

Active Member
I think it's more like a SARS-CoV-2 antigen rapid lateral flow immunochemical assay.


What they are 'properly' called is not the point and you know it.

Yeah, you are quite correct, the test is properly called that.

Whatever it is called though, it is still done using a LFD though, and those are things that are no longer free for some people, and you know that.
 

winjim

Well-Known Member
Yeah, you are quite correct, the test is properly called that.

Whatever it is called though, it is still done using a LFD though, and those are things that are no longer free for some people, and you know that.

It doesn't matter, and you know that.
 
Top Bottom