Strike!

Craig the cyclist

Senior Member
How about addressing the claim I've made that you're a disgrace to the profession you claim to be part of?
Why do I now have to justify myself to you? You make all sorts of claims, that your wife is 'as senior as a nurse can get', which was clearly bollocks and yet you have never explained what she actually does do, yet you want me to account to you?

I really could not give a shoot if you believe me or not, I have my awards tucked away on the shelf that show I have done more for the health of the population than you could ever dream of, so keep typing your nonsense, keep making yourself look like a twat by saying the Kings Fund have plucked numbers out of the air and keep your fingers crossed you don't have a stroke during the strike as all the Liverpool Hospitals and the NW Ambulances have all voted to strike. That would actually put your wife (if she exists) in an interesting position if she is on strike that day wouldn't it, although I expect you would refuse treatment until she has been given a 17% pay rise in solidarity ✊
 
My Union (NEU) are looking like they will go on strike
Doesn't affect me as I am retired

But I am rather annoyed that they started off lumping all school workers into their campaign including TAs, IT Technicians, Office Staff, site staff and all that

Slowly they have reverted to type and gone for the easy option and just looking at teachers - who have the power and the Headlines

In the meantime I know people (via the WWW mostly) who have been IT Technicians in school for many years but are leaving because their are not getting pay rises when the wages in industry are rising quickly
Or jobs are being advertised that are on the same weekly wage as ASDA are offering at the local shop for basic shelf stacking v. experienced IT Technicians running complex mission critical systems

I have met several TAs from my last school who have just given up and left behind years of experience and training to work on the tills at Tesco - bet I would meet more if I went to ASDA or Aldi
 

Craig the cyclist

Senior Member
This thread makes some points that chime with my query (unanswered by our resident nurse) about the costs to morale and retention of not striking.


View: https://twitter.com/danielgoyal/status/1590689402681905153?s=61&t=cAKeIYZeKQUzzpmtZQBWrA


I assume you mean me?

If you seriously think that the morale and retention of the nursing profession will be improved by striking, they you are wrong. As a result of this strike people will die, then like a cancer the perception of the profession will be eroded and the public will suddenly be 'my nan died, she was only 92, she had her whole life ahead of her, and she died because they want more money, they are selfish'.

Please tell me how that will improve the morale of the staff in the NHS.
 
Please tell me how that will improve the morale of the staff in the NHS.

If the outcome of the strikes, or in a sane world even the threat, is that people are paid enough to live dignified lives I suspect that morale and retention problems will ease significantly. Tell me why you think I’m wrong.
 

classic33

Regular
I assume you mean me?

If you seriously think that the morale and retention of the nursing profession will be improved by striking, they you are wrong. As a result of this strike people will die, then like a cancer the perception of the profession will be eroded and the public will suddenly be 'my nan died, she was only 92, she had her whole life ahead of her, and she died because they want more money, they are selfish'.

Please tell me how that will improve the morale of the staff in the NHS.
You, as I remember, posted about the danger you could have done as a result when you fell asleep at your desk, in your office at work. You said you were a private contractor, working in a hospital, but totally separated from patient and their care.

As a frequent user of the hospitals, beyond mine and anyone else's control, I'm behind the nurses on this. The abuse that many get on a daily level isn't worth what they're paid at present. They've been taken for granted for far too long. Especially by management. I've seen them double as cleaners, agony aunts and social workers. And punch bags for some people to take their frustrations out on. Managers wouldn't take the verbal abuse, much less the physical abuse handed out to nurses. Security would be there the minute you raised your voice to them.

How many other jobs exist where being attacked at work is an accepted part of the job? Not in the job description, but expected of them. They aren't being listened to. Or if they are, they're not being heard.

I had an adverse reaction to medication given in A&E, severe enough to be kept in for observation. Whilst in the observation ward I was visited by someone in a white coat, first impressions medically trained and checking up. No, he wanted to know if I wanted to take any further action against those involved in the incident. The doctor was finishing his report, the nurse had already been "talked to" over what she'd done. Treating a patient. I know because it was my first question to him. He, my early morning visitor was actually hospital management, hospital ID worn, with all the paperwork to hand to take the complaint. And eager to finish it in front of me. I said the problem was management cutting corners, insisting that two seperate computer systems be used, with only partial access for A&E to the full records, that were the cause of the problem, and any complaint would be directed at them not the medical staff. Clearly not the response he was hoping for, but an honest response from me. He left sheep faced, and silent.
 

Craig the cyclist

Senior Member
You, as I remember, posted about the danger you could have done as a result when you fell asleep at your desk, in your office at work. You said you were a private contractor, working in a hospital, but totally separated from patient and their care.

You won't be surprised to hear that you are confused about this. I am not a private contractor, never have been. I am also not totally separated from patient care. So you are correct in every way except the facts of the situation :okay:

But don't ever get the facts get in the way of having a go at me.
 

Craig the cyclist

Senior Member
If the outcome of the strikes, or in a sane world even the threat, is that people are paid enough to live dignified lives I suspect that morale and retention problems will ease significantly. Tell me why you think I’m wrong.

Because there will be some people who voted to strike, and those who voted not to strike (or I think you describe them as 'scabs'). On some of the nursing Twitter feeds and boards there are already people who are describing those who voted not to strike in similar language.

So I would suggest that far from bringing the profession together in a mass of action, there will be rifts in the profession after this vote, people not wanting to work with 'scabs', it has happened before in nursing.

That will damage morale beyond belief.
 
Because there will be some people who voted to strike, and those who voted not to strike (or I think you describe them as 'scabs').

Voting against strike action is a personal decision and I don’t imagine the choice was easy for most. For clarity, I see scabs as those that attempt to reduce the effectiveness of strike action.

As has already been discussed, nobody expects all work to stop so any pickets will be more of a public demonstration than a barrier to those arriving for their agreed shift.

I have asked before but I will try again. Apart from accepting yet another real terms pay cut, what should nurses do that hasn’t already been tried?
 

Craig the cyclist

Senior Member
For clarity, I see scabs as those that attempt to reduce the effectiveness of strike action.
Well, trying to make sure it doesn't happen by voting against it would seem a pretty good way of trying to reduce it's effectiveness wouldn't it?

As has already been discussed, nobody expects all work to stop
But lots of work will stop, people will come to harm and the goodwill will disappear like fog on a sunny morning.

Apart from accepting yet another real terms pay cut, what should nurses do that hasn’t already been tried?
Accept the current offer on the table of around 5%, but make it clear that the negotiations continue again from there. Accepting one deal to show willing, keep the public on side and use that goodwill as leverage.

Of course the public could join in as well and reduce the pressure on the NHS by not going to ED for minor ailments, presentation for a twisted ankle (easily treated with 2 paracetamol and some ice) a 'persistent cough' (which had been persistent for about 90 minutes) and someone who 'thought she had been bitten by a dog' (do you have a dog-no, have you been near a dog-no, why do you think you have been bitten a dog then- my ankle is a bit red)! Then, when we have made their relatives better agreeing to have them home when they are well and most incredibly on Tuesday evening, not calling one of my colleagues a 'fucking ugly slag' when she was trying to get him to move from a cubicle to a wheelchair to go for an x-ray.

Not facing that stuff will lift morale immeasurably, but there seems no appetite on here to do anything except blame the government, and soon you will have to blame the Labour party too as they are not committing to anything above what is already on the table.

I have said it over and over, but none of you listen, NO GOVERNMENT of any colour has ever adequately funded nurses pay or the whole NHS to deliver what we as a population want it to deliver.
 
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