Maureen Lipman: Cancel culture could wipe out comedy

matticus

Active Member
n.b. Is an apology using American English - if in fact you're a native English speaker - the equivalent of saying sorry with your fingers crossed behind your back.??
:whistle:
I would be dishonest if I apologised apologized for being a slave to the spellchecker.

Your thinking was far more sofisticated than mine :notworthy:
 
n.b. Is an apology using American English - if in fact you're a native English speaker - the equivalent of saying sorry with your fingers crossed behind your back.??

Sorry to be the pendant here...

Apologize is correct as the root of the word is Greek but the -ise suffix became standard in British English making it simpler by not needing to know which words came from Greek and would take -ize and which came from Latin/French and would take -ise.
 
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Fab Foodie

Fab Foodie

Well-Known Member
Sorry to be the pendant here...

Apologize is correct as the root of the word is Greek but the -ise suffix became standard in British English making it simpler by not needing to know which words came from Greek and would take -ize and which came from Latin/French and would take -ise.
As explained in an episode of Morse!
 

swansonj

Regular
Sorry to be the pendant here...

Apologize is correct as the root of the word is Greek but the -ise suffix became standard in British English making it simpler by not needing to know which words came from Greek and would take -ize and which came from Latin/French and would take -ise.
So what, in your mind, is the difference between "standard" and "correct"?

Massive thread diversion, apologies to anyone who still cares about Maureen Lipman^_^
 

Unkraut

Regular
Apologize is correct as the root of the word is Greek but the -ise suffix became standard in British English making it simpler by not needing to know which words came from Greek and would take -ize and which came from Latin/French and would take -ise.
An excellent defence of the spelling convention.
 
So what, in your mind, is the difference between "standard" and "correct"?

Massive thread diversion, apologies to anyone who still cares about Maureen Lipman^_^
Standard = acceptable in BE.
Correct = not wrong, etymologically accurate.

Just my opinion of course, I’m no linguist.
 
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