Levelling up

newfhouse

first class cockwomble
20220806_134827.jpg
 

Salty seadog

Well-Known Member
The sanctions scheme has nothing to do with either the wellbeing of claimants or saving money. It is simply a wedge with which to divide and conquer the working class.

This in spades.

Most definitely, the Tories seek to perpetuate the class system and it is the root of so many ills we face.
 
OP
OP
albion

albion

Regular
It is hard to understand those stats.
One would think that for a large percentage, jobseekers allowance is a very short term thing.

If so, then sanctions would mainly apply to a smaller portion leaving an important question.
What percentage of those struggling to find a job get sanctioned?
 

BoldonLad

Old man on a bike. Not a member of a clique.
Location
South Tyneside
It is hard to understand those stats.
One would think that for a large percentage, jobseekers allowance is a very short term thing.

If so, then sanctions would mainly apply to a smaller portion leaving an important question.
What percentage of those struggling to find a job get sanctioned?

Presumably, there are statistics for how long. Claimants are on Job Seekers allowance?

Bit out of date with various benifits, but, wasn’t / isn’t there two type of JSA, ie contribution based and non-contribution based?, or, is that ESA?
 

Mr Celine

Regular
This looks quite the opposite of levelling up.
If you read through you will find that 25% of those on Jobseekers allowance got sanctioned.
https://www.theguardian.com/society...anctions-found-to-be-ineffective-and-damaging.

Rather an old report that. No doubt the DWP will have released a more up to date one. Oh wait...

https://www.theguardian.com/society...ctiveness-of-benefit-sanctions-blocked-by-dwp
 
Presumably, there are statistics for how long. Claimants are on Job Seekers allowance?

Bit out of date with various benifits, but, wasn’t / isn’t there two type of JSA, ie contribution based and non-contribution based?, or, is that ESA?

Most benefits these days are means tested which means Universal Credit for new claims.

However if you paid the required National Insurance in the 2-3 years before needing to claim there are still benefits payable without a direct means test.

If seeking work there is New Style Job Seeker's Allowance.

If unable to work due to ill health there's New Style Employment and Support Allowance.

NS JSA lasts 6 months before you're booted over to UC.

NS ESA lasts a year unless you're pretty profoundly ill before you're booted over to Universal Credit.

Bothe NS JSA and NS ESA are eroded if you have an occupational pension.
 

BoldonLad

Old man on a bike. Not a member of a clique.
Location
South Tyneside
Most benefits these days are means tested which means Universal Credit for new claims.

However if you paid the required National Insurance in the 2-3 years before needing to claim there are still benefits payable without a direct means test.

If seeking work there is New Style Job Seeker's Allowance.

If unable to work due to ill health there's New Style Employment and Support Allowance.

NS JSA lasts 6 months before you're booted over to UC.

NS ESA lasts a year unless you're pretty profoundly ill before you're booted over to Universal Credit.

Bothe NS JSA and NS ESA are eroded if you have an occupational pension.

The example I know best has not been eligible for contribution based benefits for a long time (he has only worked about 6 months in his adult life, now aged 48). He has spent his life shuttling between JSA and ESA, and has now been moved to UC.
 

That's slightly misleading. Universal Credit is not concerned with how many hours you work but in what you earn for your work.

There are two thresholds. One is called the conditionality threshold and set out by regulation; Regulation 90 of the Universal Credit Regulations 2013. For a single person that is set at 35 * the National Living Wage; earn that and you are not required to do anything else. Earn less and you may be required to look for more work/Pay and incentivised to do so by a punitive work search regime.

As this threshold tracks the national living wage it automatically increases year by year.

In practice there is a second, lower, limit called the Administrative Earnings Threshold. If you earn more than that although notionally expected to seek to increase earnings you'll be on a light touch regime to keep in contact with the Job Centre and not unduly hassled. This limit is set Administratively and was, for some years, £355/month for a single claimant and £494 for a couple.

At the end of this month it increases to £567 for a single claimant and £782 for a couple.

The Chancellor has proposed a further increase from January.
 
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