Is it PC to name and shame a PCC?

BoldonLad

Old man on a bike. Not a member of a clique.
That’s possible, although wasn’t what I was thinking. I was referring to Paley’s point about the lack of records and suggesting there may be some evidence other than a 3rd party’s say-so.

OK, I understand.

I may be wrong on this, but, I believe that "Police Cautions" are never spent, and can and do appear on "suitability" checks (whatever they are called now) many years after the event. But, I would guess that the most likely source is someone's long memory, possibly then re-enforced with paperwork.
 

Beebo

Active Member
Do we know the circumstances of the theft?
If he was young and some alcohol ended up in his hold-all by mistake then it’s hardly the crime of the century.
I’ve worked in lots of jobs as a student and these types of thing were a “perk” of the job.
Of course a large financial fraud is a different thing.
 

the snail

Member
OK, I understand.

I may be wrong on this, but, I believe that "Police Cautions" are never spent, and can and do appear on "suitability" checks (whatever they are called now) many years after the event. But, I would guess that the most likely source is someone's long memory, possibly then re-enforced with paperwork.
I think it depends on the level of check, but when I applied for vetting, it was made clear that anything that had ever been recorded would show up, nothing was spent. I think spent convictions are ones you don't have to declare on a job application, I don't think they are deleted from the record.
 

Milkfloat

Regular
I would hope that a potential PCC would declare being sacked for theft during their many interviews so that their employer may decide based on the circumstances described. I would hope they would not be automatically barred from the position. I would also hope that by not declaring being sacked for theft that they would be removed from the position, assuming that their is satisfactory evidence. However, most of all I would hope that parliamentary privilege would not be abused in this way, save it for very important matters.
 
OP
OP
Pale Rider

Pale Rider

Well-Known Member
If he's sure of his evidence, why did he hide behind parliamentary privilege?

Media reporting.

Remarks made in parliament are covered by qualified privilege from the publisher's point of view.

Had the MP made the remarks in a press release, many media outlets would have been reluctant to use them.

Things have moved on a little.

PCC Turner is now saying he received a police caution for an 'incident' at the supermarket, he was not sacked, but resigned a short time later.

A caution is not an admission or finding of guilt, so is really the most minor of minor stains on the character.

Given it happened 20+ years ago maybe he should keep his job, although it would be a bit awkward if he got another one while in service.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tees-58637507
 

newfhouse

Jokes mostly pre-owned
A caution is not an admission or finding of guilt
It is an admission of guilt.

The police are required to follow a series of steps before a caution is issued. These include (but are not limited to) explaining the implications of accepting a caution, such as:

  • that accepting a caution is an admission of guilt and that it will form part of the recipient’s criminal record;
  • that the record of a caution will be retained by the police for future use and might be referred to in future legal proceedings and might be revealed as part of a criminal record check

https://www.bindmans.com/insight/blog/everything-you-need-to-know-about-police-cautions
 
OP
OP
Pale Rider

Pale Rider

Well-Known Member

Good point, well made.

Not a conviction, but an admission of guilt.

Thus the position now is we know Turner accepted doing something naughty, but relatively minor, since it qualified for a caution at the time.

The MP's assertion the original offence was for 'systematic theft' looks a little unlikely, although I know a few solicitors who have been surprised at how some fairly serious offences have been deemed suitable for caution.
 

Archie_tect

Active Member
The RIBA once had a Regional Director who accepted a police caution and agreed to resign, rather than be sacked, following an internal investigation which exposed their ongoing 'financial irregularities'.

This person never made any secret of their ambition to one day be a Conservative MP.
Let's just say I'm watching their career path with interest.
 
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