Climate Crisis: Are we doing enough?

albion

Well-Known Member

Only another 9999 major breakthroughs to go and they have cracked it.
 

dutchguylivingintheuk

Well-Known Member
Seems they do not need it go work.
'Lets just spend 20 billion on a dummy plant'.
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-63163966.amp

Think of the jobs! And as to sterling, think of all the free toast.
Yeah, but invest in fracking instead of an way to maximise and utilise water, wind and sun to create our energy using the efficient means of liquid hydrogen fro storage, which as a added bonus also can be used to power our cars. (and is better then battery eletric because first off refilling is the same as fueling petrol(a bit slower i think) and it's much lighter then a battery. And contrary to popular belief much less flameable
 

Ian H

Über Member
A commercially viable fusion reactor is 25 years away. I remember the number because that's what it was in 1980 and has remained so ever since.
An old school friend (well, they're all old now) had a brief stint, as a 6th former, running a pirate radio station from a Harrow basement*, then spent his entire career working on nuclear fusion. The last time we met he had just retired and was looking just a little dejected.

*After the court case he was called to the front of assembly to be given a mild dressing down by a smiling headmaster, whilst the assembled teachers tried & failed to look sombre.
 

icowden

Über Member
No great surprise that the National Trust are "acting like the captain of the titanic".

Graham Deans, the National Trust’s assistant director of operations, London and South-East, said: “Climate change poses the biggest threat to the places we care for and we believe strongly in the need to grow renewable energy and reduce the use of fossil fuels. We also believe that delivering these projects with respect for the natural and historic setting is essential.

“The National Trust holds a restrictive covenant over 3,900 acres of land in the Hambleden Valley. The purpose of the covenant is to protect and preserve the historic architecture and rural integrity of the area.

“Every planning application is individually assessed to explore whether it would have an adverse impact on the covenanted land and whether this could be mitigated.

“In the case of the proposed hydroelectric scheme at Hambleden lock, we believe the intervention and scale of the proposed structure would have a detrimental impact on the landscape.”
Not quite the captain of the Titanic. NT has supported hydroelectric at 10 sites so far. There must be something in this plan which isn't as obvious as it seems.
 

matticus

Senior Member
Not quite the captain of the Titanic. NT has supported hydroelectric at 10 sites so far. There must be something in this plan which isn't as obvious as it seems.

It's right next to Henley-on-Thames (technically Oxfordshire, but basically a suburb of Knightsbridge).
That's just a suggestion - I've only just heard about this scheme.
 

Mr Celine

Active Member
The scheme was only going to provide power for 100 homes. Hardly worth bothering with.

Nearest river based hydro scheme to Celine Towers does 220 houses on a much smaller river.
 

dutchguylivingintheuk

Well-Known Member
Not quite the captain of the Titanic. NT has supported hydroelectric at 10 sites so far. There must be something in this plan which isn't as obvious as it seems.
This is going the same way as cycle paths in this country an incoherent mess that leads to unsafe situations because for example the one council makes a two way cycle path on the left the other decide to extent the same path on the right or just let cyclist merge onto a two lane 70mph road.. why gives a fark right?

In terms of energy it mean 3001 projects with no comphension or the notion of let them work together, silly idea right?
 

albion

Well-Known Member
Whilst there is some worth that wind turbines etc can be deemed unsightly, so are roads, houses and aeroplanes.

Neccessity is here or do we just accept doom?

:shy:
 
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