Can the (Met) police ever change?

dutchguylivingintheuk

Well-Known Member
"YOU tell me what YOU think the copper was doing then, trying to steal her watch maybe, sexually assault her (if you listen to @mudsticks) read her palm?

C'mon then fella, what was happening?"

You, as in YOU @mudsticks was asked to fill in the blanks, still not the same as @shep claiming you said that. plain and simple.
So in summary you where wrong.

It couldn't be plainer what you were saying.
Unless you've reinvented the meaning of words.
As that Dutch guy seems keen to do too.
But somehow you manage to make it sounds like it's about me, it's about you reading something that wasn't there, deal with it.


Well that speaks volumes.

I have no idea of the motivation of the officer in that clip.

It certainly looks like unnecessary and prolonged contact, to me.
Well if you look at the clip the officer is kind of surprised she is giving an whole interview and such, it's also only 34 seconds what we see so it's really not a lot to draw conclusions from.
The contact itself is to put her hands behind her back and put handcuffs on, whether or not that is needed is impossible for us to say, considering we don't known her criminal record if any.
 
OP
OP
glasgowcyclist

glasgowcyclist

Well-Known Member
And shows why many women have no wish to be in the vicinity of male police officers, let alone have them touching them unnecessarily.

That level of mistrust is entirely the doing of those officers, and their colleagues who turn a blind eye.

This is exactly right; the lack of public trust in the police is the result of police action (and inaction).

Overall I am supportive of the police but this isn’t blind support. And it’s because I support them that I will point out where they are being undermined by their own officers. It is imperative that everyone can have confidence and trust in them, so any erosion of that has to be tackled swiftly and decisively by the police themselves.

Cops need to be able to speak up when they see abuse or misogyny happening in their workplace without their colleagues closing ranks against them. Until that happens, bad cops will continue to rot the service from the inside out.

This recent report shows that police vetting is failing to exclude criminals and sexual predators from recruitment.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-63478011

Hundreds of police officers who should have failed vetting checks may be in the job in England and Wales, a damning report has found.
The police watchdog looked at eight forces and found decisions on officers which were "questionable at best".
One officer convicted of domestic abuse and one accused of sexual assault were among those accepted.
"It's far too easy for the wrong people to get in," said Inspector of Constabulary, Matt Parr.
Of 725 sample cases closely examined in the review, there were concerns about 131 officers cleared to serve in police forces - but the watchdog said the true total could be much higher.
The report also highlights misogyny and sexual misconduct, and was commissioned after the murder of Sarah Everard by a serving officer, which raised questions about police recruitment and vetting.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4's Today Programme, report author Mr Parr said: "I think police leaders need to understand that unless they're much tighter with who they recruit, much tighter with who they transfer between forces, and have a much lower tolerance for the normalised, sexualised bad behaviour towards women, both members of the public and in the force… they're going to keep getting scandals and public trust is going to continue to erode."

Former Home Secretary Priti Patel commissioned the report last year from His Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary, Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS).
The authors questioned 11,000 officers and staff - and of the women who responded, "an alarming number alleged appalling behaviour by male colleagues", raising concerns about risks to people outside the police.
"Almost without exception, they'd been on the receiving end of behaviour which absolutely has no place in the modern workplace," Mr Parr added.
The survey found that most respondents thought their force's culture "discouraged prejudicial and improper behaviour", with men in general more positive about the culture.
But the report adds: "Despite these results, we found a culture where misogyny, sexism and predatory behaviour towards female police officers and staff and members of the public still exists."

Vetting is meant to be carried out when candidates apply to join or transfer to a police force and then every 10 years, or every seven for sensitive roles.
Instead, the review found officers passed despite having criminal records, being suspected of serious offences, having substantial debts or having family linked to organised crime.
 

mudsticks

Legendary Member
This is exactly right; the lack of public trust in the police is the result of police action (and inaction).

Overall I am supportive of the police but this isn’t blind support. And it’s because I support them that I will point out where they are being undermined by their own officers. It is imperative that everyone can have confidence and trust in them, so any erosion of that has to be tackled swiftly and decisively by the police themselves.

Cops need to be able to speak up when they see abuse or misogyny happening in their workplace without their colleagues closing ranks against them. Until that happens, bad cops will continue to rot the service from the inside out.

This recent report shows that police vetting is failing to exclude criminals and sexual predators from recruitment.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-63478011

Hundreds of police officers who should have failed vetting checks may be in the job in England and Wales, a damning report has found.
The police watchdog looked at eight forces and found decisions on officers which were "questionable at best".
One officer convicted of domestic abuse and one accused of sexual assault were among those accepted.
"It's far too easy for the wrong people to get in," said Inspector of Constabulary, Matt Parr.
Of 725 sample cases closely examined in the review, there were concerns about 131 officers cleared to serve in police forces - but the watchdog said the true total could be much higher.
The report also highlights misogyny and sexual misconduct, and was commissioned after the murder of Sarah Everard by a serving officer, which raised questions about police recruitment and vetting.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4's Today Programme, report author Mr Parr said: "I think police leaders need to understand that unless they're much tighter with who they recruit, much tighter with who they transfer between forces, and have a much lower tolerance for the normalised, sexualised bad behaviour towards women, both members of the public and in the force… they're going to keep getting scandals and public trust is going to continue to erode."

Former Home Secretary Priti Patel commissioned the report last year from His Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary, Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS).
The authors questioned 11,000 officers and staff - and of the women who responded, "an alarming number alleged appalling behaviour by male colleagues", raising concerns about risks to people outside the police.
"Almost without exception, they'd been on the receiving end of behaviour which absolutely has no place in the modern workplace," Mr Parr added.
The survey found that most respondents thought their force's culture "discouraged prejudicial and improper behaviour", with men in general more positive about the culture.
But the report adds: "Despite these results, we found a culture where misogyny, sexism and predatory behaviour towards female police officers and staff and members of the public still exists."

Vetting is meant to be carried out when candidates apply to join or transfer to a police force and then every 10 years, or every seven for sensitive roles.
Instead, the review found officers passed despite having criminal records, being suspected of serious offences, having substantial debts or having family linked to organised crime.
Trouble is, if you start to bring up the problem of sexual abuse and misogyny in the police, in a thread about..

'Checks notes'

The issue of sexual abuse and misogyny in the police.

And how that has eroded the trust that women have in the police.

Then you risk being accused of having a bee in your bonnet..

Or is that only when I do it 🙄

I think most of us would be highly supportive of a police force that did its job professionally, and that was far more active in stamping out sexism - and racism, homophobia - and prejudice against other marginalised groups - in its ranks and beyond.

But report after report, incident after incident, shows that's clearly not what we've got, so unsurprisingly many people don't trust them.

It's up to the police to address that.
 

mudsticks

Legendary Member
This woman had to fight hard to get something like justice.
Compensation, but still no apology.

For being assaulted and bullied in her own home, and left traumatised.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-63177303

Mr Gould believes the case raises wider issues about police accountability and the use of body-worn cameras.

"Remarkably, neither police officer either had or deployed their body-worn camera, and it was only because the bailiff had a body-worn camera that the situation was captured on film," he said.

Mr Gould believes it should be mandatory for police officers to switch on their cameras when interacting with the public.

"Unfortunately, too many times in my experience, officers are not turning those cameras on, and therefore there is no objective record," he said.

"Even when cameras are turned on, I'm involved in cases where officers are encouraging footage to be deleted or simply not preserved."
 

dutchguylivingintheuk

Well-Known Member
"Unfortunately, too many times in my experience, officers are not turning those cameras on, and therefore there is no objective record," he said.

"Even when cameras are turned on, I'm involved in cases where officers are encouraging footage to be deleted or simply not preserved."
I don't understand why officers are able to access the footage taken, that is taking away most of the purpose of those camera's they should turn on automatically and the footage should be unaccusable to the officer, in the many private companies i worked they all endorse that very simple security principle (regarding camera's very few have all with body cams, but i did work for a security company once where they did that.)
 

theclaud

Über Member
 

shep

Guru
I read that yesterday wierd ! Literally creating crime..modern policing at its finest.

Is it?

You never heard of a sting operation before or undercover cops or bait cars or capture houses used to catch criminals?

Why do so many on here seem to be anti-Police, I bet you would soon be on the phone if you were robbed or beat up in the street.

And before anyone goes off on one I've been subject to Police brutality as a 15 yr old kid but it taught me an important lesson, don't think you're Billy big bollox at a football match.
 

icowden

Über Member
You never heard of a sting operation before or undercover cops or bait cars or capture houses used to catch criminals?

Yes, but that's not the concerning issue. The concerning issue is that they encouraged someone to obtain drugs for them (etc) then imprisoned the guy for 15 months. He wasn't the target, and imprisoning him served no purpose and had no benefit. A smack on the wrist, and the shock of finding you have been working with the cops, was probably enough.

The actions were justified to smash the network, get the dealers, imprison those with weapons stashes, but I'm not sure that also condemning those at the very bottom of the crime chain who were encouraged by the cops to commit crime in the first place is justified.
 

Bazzer

Regular
Why do so many on here seem to be anti-Police, I bet you would soon be on the phone if you were robbed or beat up in the street.
I suspect most on here accept the police undertake a difficult job and individuals make mistakes.
However, society has moved on from 40+ years ago when you were at the end of police violence. But so often it appears the attitudes of officers, is not just from 40 years ago but from the era in which the TV series Life on Mars was set, or the Sweeney.
 
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